Easy DIY Lined Tray

This project was so quick and easy that I almost didn’t post it… And then I thought, if something is so quick and easy, and I love it, that’s all the more reason to share!

I was in a rush, so I forgot to take a “before” picture, but just imagine a plain wooden tray. And then look at this!

Easy DIY Lined Tray | Jewels at Home

The inside of this tray had a few water stains, and I was trying to think of an easy way to make it pretty and also more water-resistant for serving drinks. I remembered I had some of this Laura Ashley Self-Adhesive Shelf Liner leftover from laminating recipe cards at Christmas, and ta-da!!

Easy DIY lined tray | Jewels at Home

20140323-202235.jpg

Easy DIY lined tray | Jewels at Home

 

That’s all – except now I want to do a dozen more trays with a dozen other pretty patterns. I should add it to my collection of ideas for decorating trays. It may have taken longer to write this post than it took to line my tray!

Get to it, fellow DIY friends!

“Jewels”

 

Elegant Ottoman Makeover

Okay, so I will admit that I had a very low starting point with these inexpensive storage cubes that I found on sale at Target. In their original colors, they’re so garish that it’s hard to imagine how anyone would have chosen to manufacture and sell them to begin with. I believe they were marketed towards the back-to-college dorm crowd, but I have more faith than that in the youth of today.

DIY storage ottoman makeover.  An elegant transformation for these $9.99 storage cubes.  Jewels at Home.

Not surprisingly, there were a large number of these fabric ottomans on clearance for $9.99 each at our local store. I had been looking for some storage cubes to serve as toy storage and double as seating in our family room. Even though the fluorescent colors were far from what I wanted, the size and functionality were perfect! Luckily, I had also just purchased a large remnant of beautiful ikat fabric to do projects in that room, and so this project was born!

DIY storage ottoman makeover.  An elegant transformation for these $9.99 storage cubes.  Jewels at Home.

I measured and cut fabric to cover the bases and lids of the cubes with extra allowance to fold under the edges. Because of the large-scale design, I was careful to match the pattern, so that the two cubes would work well together. Because of the very bright color of the original fabric on the cubes, I also cut out plain white fabric to go behind my print and hide the original color. For the base of the cubes, I sewed a tube that would slip over the cube (pictured below).

DIY storage ottoman makeover.  An elegant transformation for these $9.99 storage cubes.  Jewels at Home.

I wrapped the top edge of the fabric around the top of the cube, folded under a small hem, and used a staple gun to secure it to the frame on the inside of the cube. I started by placing a staple in the center of each side and then worked towards the corners. I then did the same to secure the bottom edge of the fabric to the bottom of the cube (pictured below) and to the lids of the cubes.  It helps to trim fabric from the corners, so it doesn’t get too bulky.

DIY storage ottoman makeover.  An elegant transformation for these $9.99 storage cubes.  Jewels at Home.

And here they are, full of boys… I mean toys!  Our family room seems to be constantly changing as the kids grow, but I’m happy with this bright and comfortable space for now.

DIY storage ottoman makeover.  An elegant transformation for these $9.99 storage cubes.  Jewels at Home.

DIY storage ottoman makeover.  An elegant transformation for these $9.99 storage cubes.  Jewels at Home.

DIY storage ottoman makeover.  An elegant transformation for these $9.99 storage cubes.  Jewels at Home.

DIY storage ottoman makeover.  An elegant transformation for these $9.99 storage cubes.  Jewels at Home.

DIY storage ottoman makeover.  An elegant transformation for these $9.99 storage cubes.  Jewels at Home.

DIY storage ottoman makeover.  An elegant transformation for these $9.99 storage cubes.  Jewels at Home.

DIY storage ottoman makeover.  An elegant transformation for these $9.99 storage cubes.  Jewels at Home.

“Jewels”

Dreamy DIY Daybed

I have a serious thing for daybeds. There is something so primally cozy about curling up on a deep bed, surrounded by cushions.

This window seat daybed is so inviting and simple to assemble.  Details on this DIY project from Jewels at Home.

Daybeds are practical, too. I have one in my craft studio, which is also our guest room. It’s a twin bed for our single guests, and there is a pop-up trundle below that can be combined with the main bed to make a king bed for couples and families.

When we added built-in closets to our master bedroom, they created a little alcove under the windows that was perfect for a window seat. Rather than a narrow bench, I decided to fill this space with a deep daybed, perfect for reading, napping, or lounging and taking in the view.

This space will also work out for those nights when a nightmare brings a little one into our room in the middle of the night… see, practical!

I considered building something myself, but I was nervous that that kind of project might never get done, with three kids running around. So, I did a lot of browsing and measuring to find ready-made materials that would fit together into an almost-built-in deep window seat and then added handmade touches with the pillows and storage boxes.

I found that three of these Closetmaid 3 Cube White Storage Benches filled the space almost end to end, leaving just enough room to access the electrical outlets on the walls at either end. The benches I bought are only 14″ deep, but I was able to add extra depth with some existing pieces boxes and shelves around the house, to create a luxurious 30″ deep daybed. To top it all off, I used two basic crib mattresses which fit perfectly across and provide great support. This Safety 1st Heavenly Dreams White Crib Mattress is reasonably priced and on the larger side (did you know crib mattresses were not a standard size?!), so it fills up the bench nicely.

Although I used benches out of a box and ready-made mattresses, this project has lots of handmade touches as well:

  • seat cushion cover
  • round bolster pillows and other decorative pillows – I used a variety of fabrics that capture the color scheme of the room – warm neutral gray with accents in red and turquoise.
  • fabric-covered storage boxes – JJ is potty-trained now, except for overnight, and these are overnight diaper boxes, that fit perfectly inside the cubbies, with just a half inch trimmed from the top. I have complete instructions for these and other storage boxes in another post.

I’m beyond happy with out new window seat and am looking forward to enjoying many quiet moments here.

 

This window seat daybed is so inviting and simple to assemble.  Details on this DIY project from Jewels at Home.

This window seat daybed is so inviting and simple to assemble.  Details on this DIY project from Jewels at Home.

This window seat daybed is so inviting and simple to assemble.  Details on this DIY project from Jewels at Home.

“Jewels”

Window Seat Bench Cushion

I occasionally get obsessed with a project that I just can’t get out of my head. The window seat daybed in our master bedroom was definitely one of these!  The daybed itself was easy to assemble from purchased benches and crib mattresses, but projects for this cozy alcove went on and on! One of the biggest was sewing the covers for the daybed mattresses.  I love the Robert Allen Souk fabric in Dove, and I’ll show you how to make these covers yourself.

I love this comfortable and beautiful daybed nestled under a window.  Step by step instructions for assembling the daybed from purchased parts and sewing all the accessories. Jewels at Home.

As a guideline, I used these instructions from Kate at the Centsational Girl blog to sew the covers.  My dimensions are different, and I didn’t see how she did the back corners, so I’ll show all the steps here.

Supplies for covering two crib mattresses:

  • 5 yards of 54″ wide fabric
  • Velcro – total of 104″ sew-on strips for both mattresses
  • thread, scissors, pins, general sewing supplies

Because the daybed is made from crib mattresses that are 52″ long, I was able to use the full width of a standard 54″ wide decorator fabric across the mattress.  For each mattress, I cut a 70″ long x 54″ wide (full width) section of fabric and zig-zagged the raw edges of each piece.

I laid the fabric over the mattress and marked where the front seams would be. (Pictured below)

Instructions for sewing an cushion cover to make a daybed out of a crib mattress | Jewels at Home

Mark the fabric to where the front seams will be.

I then folded the fabric at the seam and sewed with a 3/8″ seam allowance to create a clean seam for the front edges of the cushion. (Pictured below)

Instructions for sewing an cushion cover to make a daybed out of a crib mattress | Jewels at Home

Fold and sew to create the front seams.

Each mattress required two 6.5″x 32″ side panels, and I again zig-zagged the edges. These are longer than the width of the mattress, so they can wrap around the back to keep any of the mattress from showing.

To attach the side panels, line up the end of the side panels with the front of the main panel (between the seams) and sew that small section with a 1/2 inch seam allowance. (top left picture below)

Next, turn and pin the long edge of the side panels in place and sew with a 1/2 inch seam allowance. Since the side panels are longer than the mattress, I marked on the main panel where the back edge of the cushion should be and sewed up to that point. (top right picture below)

Instructions for sewing an cushion cover to make a daybed out of a crib mattress | Jewels at Home

Adding the side panels to the cushion cover. Sew the front edge first and then the side seams.

After attaching all the side panels, I finished the ends of the panels by folding under a 1/2 inch hem and stitching.  (Top left picture below)

For the back closure, I had one short flap and one long one, so the closure was along the edge of the cushion. While this looks very neat when finished, in retrospect, I would have centered the closure on the back, so I could flip the cushion over if it gets worn without any of the closure showing at the edge.

I sewed one side of the Velcro to the outside of the short flap and the other side to the inside of the long flap. (Top right picture below) It looks very neat when done!

Instructions for sewing an cushion cover to make a daybed out of a crib mattress | Jewels at Home

Finishing the cushion cover. Finish the edges of the side panels, so they can wrap around the back of the cushion. Sew velcro to the inside of one back flap and the outside of the other. Ta-da!

I’m so happy with how these new cushion covers fit and look!  A neat tip: to keep the cushions from moving around, I used a rug pad underneath.

We’ve already started hanging out on our new window seat already, and there are just a few more projects left to finish up this cozy alcove!

Dreamy daybed window seat.  Assemble this from packaged benches and mattresses.  Today, instructions for sewing an cushion cover to make a daybed out of a crib mattress | Jewels at Home

Dreamy daybed window seat.  Assemble this from packaged benches and mattresses.  Today, instructions for sewing an cushion cover to make a daybed out of a crib mattress | Jewels at Home

Dreamy daybed window seat.  Assemble this from packaged benches and mattresses.  Today, instructions for sewing an cushion cover to make a daybed out of a crib mattress | Jewels at Home

I’ve got more cushions planned, including round bolsters to finish off the ends of the bench.  I’m looking forward to showing you the finishing touches soon!

“Jewels”

Decoupaged Mirror Frame (Ikea Malma)

These wide-frame mirrors from Ikea have so many possibilities! You could hang them as they are, of course, but what fun to decorate them with a tile mosaic, paint, or paper!

In setting a theme for our tween boy’s new room, I found this fun and colorful Heroes and Villains wrapping paper. I’m using it for some DIY pencil tins and also covered some Ikea Malma mirror frames for his wall.

This is an easy project.  You’ll need a mirror, wrapping paper, Mod Podge, and a brush.  I started by using painter’s tape (okay, I guess you’ll need that, too) to cover up the mirror in the center, so it wouldn’t get glue on it. (pictured below, left).  I then spread a layer of Mod Podge over the mirror frame and carefully lay the paper on top, lining it up and smoothing out the wrinkles. (pictured below, right)

Decorating an Ikea Malma mirror frame.  Decoupage with wrapping paper.  {Jewels at Home}

Cover the mirror with painter’s tape (left). Spread Mod Podge over the frame and lay the wrapping paper on top (right).

To fit the paper around the mirror, I cut an “X” shape and then trimmed the paper with a craft knife (oh yes, you need that, too!).  (pictured below, left)  To wrap the paper around the edge of the frame, I cut squares out from the corners and then applied more Mod Podge and wrapped the paper around, smoothing out the wrinkles and bubbles. (pictured below, right)

Decorating an Ikea Malma mirror frame.  Decoupage with wrapping paper.  {Jewels at Home}

Cut an “X” in the center and trim the paper with a craft knife (left). Cut squares out of the corners and apply the paper around the frame with the Mod Podge (right).

I finished off the mirror with a few coats of Mod Podge to seal the paper and give it a glossy finish.  I hung the mirrors with my favorite Command Picture-Hanging Strips.

Here’s how the finished mirror looks:

Decorating an Ikea Malma mirror frame.  Decoupage with wrapping paper.  {Jewels at Home}

And below are some pictures of the entire wall.  Also featured on this wall are

Vintage comic-themed gallery wall with DIY mirror frame, wall initials, and gallery clip frames.  Includes link to a source for these beautiful vintage comic covers.  {Jewels at Home}

Vintage comic-themed gallery wall with DIY mirror frame, wall initials, and gallery clip frames.  Includes link to a source for these beautiful vintage comic covers.  {Jewels at Home}

Vintage comic-themed gallery wall with DIY mirror frame, wall initials, and gallery clip frames.  Includes link to a source for these beautiful vintage comic covers.  {Jewels at Home}

This sweet tween’s room is almost ready.  His desk is on order, and I look forward to showing you the completed space, soon!

“Jewels”

Living Room Tour

After some peeks into the small spaces in our house – the powder room, the nursery, the laundry, the master bath – I’m glad I can show you our living room. It’s actually only one half of the original living room – we are using the other half of this enormous room as our dining room, and we turned the separate dining room into a family room.

I am not sure quite how to describe the style – it’s a little bit contemporary but classic. It has Chinese elements, but more of a Regency Chinoiserie feel than traditional Chinese. Is this the Asian fusion of the decorating world? Anyway, I love the cool soothing blues and grays warmed up with some green. It satisfies my desire for a grown-up space but is still a very comfortable spot to hang out.

Not much more explanation needed, so I’ll get to the pictures.  I’ve included links to the many DIY projects in this room.

Living room tour. Classic contemporary space with Asian elements.  {Jewels at Home}

A view of the living room side of our living-dining room, from the foyer.

Living room tour. Classic contemporary space with Asian elements.  {Jewels at Home}

The bamboo brush paintings are by my mom.  I sewed the living room pillows and repainted the vintage marble-top coffee table.

Living room tour. Classic contemporary space with Asian elements.  {Jewels at Home}

Living room tour. Classic contemporary space with Asian elements.  {Jewels at Home}

This picture was from the Holiday House Tour:

Living room tour. Classic contemporary space with Asian elements.  {Jewels at Home}

I love this elegant old Chinese chair that I picked up at the flea market.  It’s sitting by the window, next to a craigslist-find chest that I painted in teal.

Living room tour. Classic contemporary space with Asian elements.  {Jewels at Home}

Here’s another sunny view of our living room.  I love that it has so many windows.

Living room tour. Classic contemporary space with Asian elements.  {Jewels at Home}

Living room tour. Classic contemporary space with Asian elements.  {Jewels at Home}

Living room tour. Classic contemporary space with Asian elements.  {Jewels at Home}

Living room tour. Classic contemporary space with Asian elements.  {Jewels at Home}

To the left of the piano is an antique wooden window screen that I painted, and on top is a repurposed shoe box, decorated with paper.

Living room tour. Classic contemporary space with Asian elements.  {Jewels at Home}

These nesting tables are from a consignment store, and the silver box is a rummage sale find that I painted in silver.

Living room tour.  Classic contemporary space with Asian elements.  {Jewels at Home}

This vignette on top of a bookshelf includes some art from a favorite calendar, an antique Korean vase given to us by Steve’s parents, and a little Japanese dish I picked up years ago while shopping with my mom and sister.

Living room tour. Classic contemporary space with Asian elements.  {Jewels at Home}

The bookshelf on the other side of the window has a similarly sentimental display – art from a calendar and from an old friend, a small blue and white Chinese vase from my grandmother’s house, and some candle sticks I found in thrift store.

Living room tour. Classic contemporary space with Asian elements.  {Jewels at Home}

Thanks for visiting!

“Jewels”

Vintage Find: Marble-topped Coffee Table

I think you know by now that I love a great vintage find – what a great way to add character to your home, save money, and keep things out of the landfill.

My latest treasure is a marble-topped coffee table I found on Craigslist. I looked for a few weeks before finding something the right size and style for our space. This table has just enough curves and details to show its history – the seller said, it was his grandmother’s from the 1950s – without being overly ornate or fussy.

Paint and some minor repairs brought this vintage table back to life!  {Jewels at Home}

A quick paint job in glossy black gave the base of the table an elegant new look, and there was a small chip in the marble top that I repaired.

Living room seating area with contemporary regency style.  Paint and some minor repairs brought the vintage coffee table back to life!  {Jewels at Home}

Living room seating area with contemporary regency style.  Paint and some minor repairs brought the vintage coffee table back to life!  {Jewels at Home}

 

I think our living room is finally complete, so I will post some more pictures of the space soon!

 

Living room seating area with contemporary regency style.  Paint and some minor repairs brought the vintage coffee table back to life!  {Jewels at Home}

“Jewels”

Bench Made From Chairs

So, I’ve been a bit crazy for chairs this year…

First, I picked up this beauty at the antiques fair on New Year’s Day.

Living room vignette with vintage chair, painted chest, and new cushions.  From Jewels at Home.

Living room vignette with vintage chair, painted chest, and new cushions.

Then, I refinished these free Queen Anne chairs found through Craigslist…

Queen Anne chair makeover by Jewels at Home

Free Queen Anne chairs found through Craigslist: from worn and boring to fresh and elegant!

And I went on to paint and reupholster our dining chairs

Ikea dining chair makeover by Jewels at Home

Another step in the evolution of our old Ikea chairs. This new fabric gives them an elegant yet whimsical feel that fits in with the Chinoiserie/ Regency look I am working on in our living-dining room.

Along the way, I could not resist these traditional Chinese chairs, also a deal on Craigslist.

Solid wood traditional Chinese chairs.

Solid wood traditional Chinese chairs.

Suddenly, I had too many chairs… and I still wanted a bench for our front hallway. Do you sense a solution here? I did!

While you could certainly get clever with carpentry and join chairs together in a number of creative ways (side by side in a row; on either end with a board in between; with two chair backs turned 90 degrees to make the ends of the bench, etc..), I didn’t want to permanently alter these chairs, since they are well-made and beautiful and might move on to a new purpose some day.

Instead, I chose to strap the chairs together and use cushions to give the feel of a single piece of furniture.

Strapping the chairs together

To make the chairs work together as a bench, I started by strapping them together. I used felt strips that were 2″ wide and long enough to wrap around two chair legs with 2″ overlap. I put straps at the back of the chairs, at the top and bottom of each leg. Measure the top and bottom of the legs separately, since they might not be the same width.

In the picture below,

  • Because my felt was thin, I started by sewing two layers of fabric together. (top left)
  • Then, I sewed velcro onto each end of the strip, as shown: the hook side on one end, and the loop side on the back side of the other end. You could use 2″ wide velcro, but I just used the narrower strips I already had and put two strips side by side. (top right)
  • This is how the finished straps look with the ends joined. (bottom left)
  • Here’s how they work on the chairs. These simple straps held the chairs in line pretty securely. (bottom right)
Sew straps to link chairs together into a bench.  Jewels at Home.

Sew straps to link chairs together into a bench.

Cushions

I took off the three separate chair cushions and added a single big one. After going around and around with all the options for fabric, I chose this textured fabric that has shades of blue, green, and grey in it. It ties together a lot of elements in the foyer and living room and doesn’t compete with the design of the chairs.

I added two bolster cushions in this really fun print: Barber in powder blue by Premier Prints. The technique for making the bolsters was detailed in the tutorial on sewing pillows. I used two, rather than three, to take attention away from the three separate chairs. I’m thinking of ways to use some more of this fabric on the living room that is right off the foyer.

Storage baskets
Finally, I tucked these faux leather storage crates under the chairs for the boys to keep their school bags and library books, so these things don’t get lost.

Finished “Bench”

Our new entry bench and storage system is working very well, and I like how it looks, too.

Ideas for joining chairs into a bench.  From Jewels at Home.

Ideas for joining chairs into a bench.  From Jewels at Home.

Ideas for joining chairs into a bench.  From Jewels at Home.

With a little bit of creativity, this “bench” has turned out to be a useful and attractive addition to our front hall.  Now back to some other chairs I picked up for free on the side of the road…

“Jewels”

Mid-Century Nightstand/ Dresser with Dipped Legs

To our delight, both our older boys love reading, and they recently requested a little nightstand to put their books on, so I poked around on Craigslist and found this cool-looking Mid-Century low dresser that was cosmetically-challenged but I thought would look great painted in grey.

Well, you know how Craigslist is – some people are completely friendly and professional and others can be a bit quirky or flaky. The guy selling this dresser was definitely friendly, but he did push back the time of our meeting several times, including once when we were already on the road, and he seemed to be struggling a bit to adjust to his move and letting go of some of his furniture. Anyway, we finally brought the dresser home.

A couple of days later, the seller of the dresser texted me to ask if he could buy the dresser back. That’s a first! But knowing that he was very attached to it, I didn’t want to be mean, so I agreed to sell it back to him. I was disappointed, but by that point, I was committed to the look, so I found the Sveio dresser at Ikea that has almost the same shape. I’m not crazy about the look in white, but since I was planning on painting ours anyway, I figured it would work out. Fast forward a few more hours, and the dresser’s former owner had changed his mind again and said he was not coming to pick it up.

Okay?! Whatever?! I got to work transforming this great vintage find into something cool and functional for the boys.

Mid-Century dresser found on Craigslist ready for a makeover!

BEFORE: Mid-Century dresser found on Craigslist ready for a makeover!  I forgot to take a picture before I started patching the damaged parts of the wood.

Sveio chest with drawers from Ikea

Sveio chest with drawers from Ikea has Mid-Century lines.

While part of me hated to paint over this classic piece of furniture, it really had seen better days. There were a lot of chips in the veneer and a dark stain on the top – so I felt I was better off painting it than trying to restore the wood finish.

I started with wiping it down and using some wood filler to patch up the most damaged parts of the veneer. When the wood filler was dry, I sanded the whole piece and wiped it down again.

I was inspired by this piece I saw at The Wits Blog, with the brass leg caps, so I taped off the bottom of the legs to leave the original wood.

Grey dresser makeover by The Wits.

Grey dresser makeover by The Wits.

Go to The Wits blog

For the rest of the dresser, I used a coat of primer followed by a couple of coats of Benjamin Moore Amherst Gray (HC-167).

I finished by rubbing the dresser with some furniture polish to give it a smooth protective finish.

Mid-Century dresser painted in Benjamin Moore Amherst Gray with reverse "dipped" legs. Get the same look with a Ikea Sveio hack.  From Jewels at Home.

Mid-Century dresser painted in Benjamin Moore Amherst Gray with reverse “dipped” legs.

Mid-Century nightstand painted with "dipped" legs.  Get the same look with a Ikea Sveio hack.  From Jewels at Home.

Close-up view of the legs of the painted Mid-Century nightstand, with a reverse “dipped” finish.

I’m happy with how the nightstand turned out, and it looks great in the boys’ room.  They love it and have already filled the drawers with their books and treasures.  Here’s how it looks in place.  Their room still needs a lot more decorating, but this is a good start!

Mid-Century nightstand makeover.  Get the same look with a Sveio Ikea hack.  From Jewels at Home.

Mid-Century nightstand with a new painted look.

Boys' room with a painted Mid-Century nightstand.  From Jewels at Home.

Boys’ room with a painted Mid-Century dresser.

Mid-Century nightstand painted in Benjamin Moore Amherst Gray with reverse "dipped" legs.  From Jewels at Home.

Mid-Century nightstand painted in Benjamin Moore Amherst Gray with reverse “dipped” legs. The cool baseball player lamp is a gift from the boys’ uncle. He brought it home from Korea.

And here’s the final before-and-after picture!

Mid-Century dresser painted in Benjamin Moore Amherst Gray with reverse "dipped" legs.  You could get this look with an Ikea Sveio hack, too.  From Jewels at Home.

So, this post turned out to be about making over a battered vintage dresser, but it almost became an Ikea Sveio hack, and that would have been okay, too.  If you try this with Sveio, you could leave the legs white or paint them another color first, before taping them off.  I hope this dresser’s former owner finds happiness, because our boys are very happy with their slick new nightstand.

Are you looking for your own diamond in the rough to transform? I’m excited to share that my friend Ari launched a slick new furniture re-sale site over at www.revolvingdecor.com. Check it out to participate in a curated online marketplace for great furniture finds!

“Jewels”

Faux Bamboo Fetish – Dining Room Sideboard

I recently became obsessed with the look of vintage faux bamboo dressers, like those made by Thomasville or Henry Link in the 60s and 70s. These dressers have come back into fashion, repainted for a gorgeous new look. I see them on eBay and Etsy regularly, but with the shipping costs from across the country, it doesn’t seem quite worth it. I’m also nervous about taking on such a big project. As Ibie, whose dresser is in the second picture below, chronicles on her blog, the painting process on such a large piece is not for the fainthearted.

Here are some of the beautiful makeovers that caught my eye:

Callie's black dresser featured on Little Green Notebook

Callie’s black dresser featured on Little Green Notebook. I love the glossy black finish, and the rest of this room is fantastic, too!

Go to Little Green Notebook

Ibie's grey Henry Link dresser on One Story Building

Ibie’s grey Henry Link dresser on One Story Building. This looks so sophisticated and elegant! I certainly believe her that it was a bear to paint, though.

Go to One Story Building

I still have this project in the back of my mind, and I occasionally look around on Craigslist, eBay, and Etsy for that perfect dresser to repaint, but for now, I’m happy with an easier update to our old dresser. This is actually an inexpensive piece that we bought a decade ago. We almost got rid of it a couple of years back, but no one on Craigslist even wanted it, so we decided to repair all the sagging drawer bottoms, and I’m so glad that it has a new life as the sideboard in our dining room.

BEFORE: Old dresser we are using as a sideboard.

BEFORE: Old dresser we are using as a sideboard.

The hardware we had on there is a little rustic for our space, so I decided to give those old knobs a new life down at my dad’s beach house and replace the hardware with – what else – faux bamboo pulls! I chose this Belwith Bamboo Collection black nickel cabinet pull
, and there were several others out there that also look great, and I put some of my favorites on Pinterest.

Belwith Bamboo Pull

Belwith Bamboo Pull

Since the new pulls need two holes, I had to drill new ones. TIP: I used a piece of a piece of painter’s taped marked with the distance between the holes, so I could quickly measure and drill.

TIP: mark the distance between holes for cabinet hardware on a piece of painter's tape.  From Jewels at Home.

TIP: mark the distance between holes for cabinet hardware on a piece of painter’s tape.

And here’s the “new” old dresser. No, it’s not as stunning as an old Regency dresser painted in an elegant new color, but it was quick, easy, and inexpensive.

New faux bamboo hardware gives an old dresser new life.

New faux bamboo hardware gives our old dresser new life.

New hardware gives an old dresser new life.

20120803-202021.jpg

I’m happy with the result of this little project, and will still keep my eye out for something perfect.

“Jewels”